Concept Cars of Tomorrow

With gas in the United States averaging $3.31 per gallon this week and the average car getting about 27 mpg in regular driving conditions, the latest concept car was featured on ABC News. Peugeot Citroen announced a ???hybrid air??? prototype that is powered by compressed air. It claims that the air is refilled internally by the engine and the brake system from the car and gets a 117 MPG. The company claims that it would cut gas cost by as much as 80 percent and that production, which would start in 2016, would begin in compact size cars and expand to mid-sized vehicles.
On average, I drive 93 miles daily to work and approximately 10 miles daily for my ???honey-do??? list. My routine of $20.00 of gas and $1.00 for the cup of ???Joe??? in mornings leaves me with a total of $430.00 spent monthly on fuel. As an average middle-class American with three children and spouse, mortgage, car insurance and all other expenses in life, $430.00 feels more like $4300.00. As our dollar in stretched to the limits here in America, I question why this technology is not at the fore-front of our debates. With air powered or electric cars, Americans not only clean up our footprint, but allow the money spent at the pumps to be used on other necessities or luxuries that stimulate the economy. I understand that some may state that this is far-fetched and that oil companies will raise prices in order to maintain profit levels. What if this technology could eliminate the need all together
These types of ???concept vehicles??? have been introduced before and will continue to intrigue our imaginations. My concern is when the companies will actually produce a model that is affordable to the average person, what will warranty cover; will the technicians be available at affordable rates All concerns that I share with others, but without the idea of concept vehicle, what would gas prices be With new technology comes higher prices, I understand that. The cost of production of these cars will come down as it has with other products that first hit the market. Manufactures from the United States such as GM and others that used the bailout money should considering helping the economy and the environment by producing affordable energy efficient cars. I want to buy American products, but I want 117 miles per gallon.